GM flips to California’s side in pollution fight with Trump

 GM flips to California’s side in pollution fight with Trump
FILE - In this July 16, 2019 file photo, General Motors Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra speaks during the opening of their contract talks with the United Auto Workers in Detroit. General Motors says it will no longer support the Trump administration in legal efforts to end California's right to set its own clean-air standards. Barra said in a letter Monday, Nov. 23, 2020 to environmental groups that GM will pull out of the lawsuit, and it urges other automakers to do so. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

FILE – In this July 16, 2019 file photo, General Motors Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra speaks during the opening of their contract talks with the United Auto Workers in Detroit. General Motors says it will no longer support the Trump administration in legal efforts to end California’s right to set its own clean-air standards. Barra said in a letter Monday, Nov. 23, 2020 to environmental groups that GM will pull out of the lawsuit, and it urges other automakers to do so. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

DETROIT – General Motors is switching sides in the legal fight against California’s right to set its own clean-air standards, abandoning the Trump administration as the president’s term nears its close.

CEO Mary Barra said in a letter Monday to environmental groups that GM will no longer support the Trump administration in its defence against a lawsuit over its efforts against California’s standards. And GM is urging other automakers to do the same.

The move is a sign that GM and other automakers are anticipating big changes when President-elect Joe Biden takes office in January. Already at least one other large automaker, Toyota, said it may join GM in switching to California’s team.

In her letter, Barra wrote that the company agrees with Biden’s plan to expand electric vehicle use. Last week, GM said it is testing a new battery chemistry that will bring down electric vehicle costs to those of gas-powered vehicles within five years.

Barra sent the letter after a Monday morning conversation with Mary Nichols, head of California’s Air Resources Board, the company said. The board is the state’s air pollution regulator.

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Redak staff

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