Trump Can not Just “Go” To The Supreme Court To Combat Election Results. Here’s How It Would End Up There

 Trump Can not Just “Go” To The Supreme Court To Combat Election Results. Here’s How It Would End Up There
Trump’s rhetoric created a look of legal unpredictability around the election results that does not exist yet– by Wednesday night, there were a handful of lawsuits pending, but none involved the kind of substantial battles over last vote tallies that would choose the outcome of the race. Trump’s project stated they’ll seek a recount in Wisconsin after former vice president Joe Biden was stated the winner, and could attempt to go to court to challenge the outcomes if he still lost after that.

There’s currently a case pending prior to the Supreme Court about whether Pennsylvania can count absentee ballots that get here in between Nov. 4 and Nov. 6, but that would only be a vehicle for deciding the election if the race came down to Pennsylvania’s 20 electoral votes– and if those as-yet-unknown number of post– Election Day tallies would alter the result.

Despite whether the Trump project’s lawsuits be successful in stopping any tallies from being counted, they’ve highlighted Trump and his campaign’s efforts to falsely question the lawfulness of tally counting that extends beyond Election Day– something that takes place in every election. On Wednesday, lots of Michigan locals attempted to interrupt tally counting at a site in Detroit, stimulated by phony info that spread out online of extensive scams.

Trump’s project filed five new legal actions on Wednesday. Two are focused on stopping tally counting in Michigan and Pennsylvania on the premises that the Trump project and Republican politicians haven’t gotten as much access to observe the proce

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Redak staff

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