US federal government authorizes paths for Wyoming CO2 pipelines

 US federal government authorizes paths for Wyoming CO2 pipelines

FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2014, file photo, pipes and tanks snake around the inside of a carbon capture and storage facility during the official opening of the facility at the Boundary Dam Power Station in Estevan, Saskatchewan. Boundary Dam has the only currently operational power plant-to-oilfield pipeline for carbon capture in North America. The U.S. government under Donald Trump's administration has approved routes for a system of pipelines that would move carbon dioxide across Wyoming in what could be by far the largest such network in North America, if developed. (Michael Bell/The Canadian Press, via AP, File)
1 of 2 FILE – In this Oct. 2, 2014, file picture, pipes and tanks snake around the inside of a carbon capture and storage facility during the main opening of the facility at the Boundary Dam Power Station in Estevan, Saskatchewan. (Michael Bell/The Canadian Press, through AP, File) Michael Bell/AP
FILE - In this Oct. 29, 2020 file photo Interior Secretary David Bernhardt takes reporters' questions during a stop at the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge in Bloomington, Minn. The U.S. government has approved routes for a system of pipelines that would move carbon dioxide across Wyoming in what could be by far the largest such network in North America, if it is developed. Bernhardt signed the plans Friday, Jan. 15, 2021, days before leaving office with the rest of President Donald Trump's administration.
2 of 2 FILE – In this Oct. 29, 2020 file picture Interior Secretary David Bernhardt takes press reporters’ questions throughout a stop at the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Haven in Bloomington, Minn. Jim Mone/AP

CASPER, Wyo. (AP)– The U.S. federal government has actually approved routes for a system of pipelines that would move carbon dioxide throughout Wyoming in what might be without a doubt the largest such network in The United States and Canada, if it is developed.

The greenhouse gas would be caught from coal-fired power plants, keeping it out of the environment where it causes worldwide warming. The caught gas would instead be pumped underground to include pressure to and boost production from oil fields.

In all, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management designated 1,100 miles (1,770 kilometers) of federal land for pipeline advancement through the Wyoming Pipeline Corridor Effort, the Casper Star-Tribune reported.

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